Wednesday, 25 January 2017

We can’t get any further without microscopy …

I’ve heard that one before …



Back in October 2016, when I seemed to have a bit more time on my hands, I spent a number of days hunting for fungal delights in the rich and varied woodlands of Ebernoe Common in West Sussex. Over 1000 species have been recorded here including many that are nationally rare.

With a passion for the smaller things in life, on Monday, 31st October I photographed the above species. The off-white fruiting bodies of this tiny ascomycete fungus, approximately 1 to 1.5mm across, were found on a rotting piece of timber, possibly English Yew Taxus baccata. Lachnum and Dasyscyphella are probably good guesses, but unfortunately I won’t get any further without a sample [which I didn’t take] and microscopy.

I’ll be taking sample pots next time …

References:

Sterry, P. and Hughes. B. (2009). Collins Complete Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools. London: HarperCollins, p. 316, fig. p. 317.

4 comments:

  1. Really hard to get such good shots of something that small...a dining service for fairies that live under stones.

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  2. Finally found the comment box on this entry, seems I'm getting old and or Google has changed their format. Anyways a great find and images. While true it needs microscopy, I am beginning to really hate hearing that statement as it's becoming more prevalent lately and I think it's an "easy out" statement for many. One thing I remember from long ago is that the stem, or lack thereof, is important in deciding which it is. I'll have to go through our notes to see if I can find that reference, it was a long time ago and while I am sure it relates to this fungus family I am not 100% at the moment if it's this pair or not.

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  3. Thanks, Simon. Appreciated. I do like the idea of a 'dining service for fairies that live under stones'. I'll have to keep my eyes open for them ...

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  4. Thanks, Jim. Glad you like the pictures. I don't recall a stem being present and having looked at my other images I feel this is probably the case. I'll certainly be taking more notes next time.

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