Tuesday, 27 February 2018

Getting your eye in …

Alder Goblet (Ciboria caucus)




Found solitary or in small groups on the fallen male catkins of the Common Alder Alnus glutinosa or willows, C. caucus is a widespread species though one that is easily overlooked due to its small size and wet habitat.

References:

Phillips, R. (2006). Mushrooms. London: Pan Macmillan, p. 369, fig. f.
Sterry, P. and Hughes. B. (2009). Collins Complete Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools. London: HarperCollins, p. 326, fig. p. 327.

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Auricularia ...

Jelly Ear (Auricularia auricula-judae)


The gelatinous and often ear-shaped A. auricula-judae (Auriculariales: Auriculariaceae) is a widespread and common species. It can be found on living or dead branches of a wide variety of hardwoods but especially those of Sambucus nigra, the Black Elder. The above example, one of a small group, was recently photographed at Ebernoe Common in West Sussex.

References:

Buczacki, S., Shields, C. and Ovenden, D. (2012). Collins Fungi Guide: The most complete field guide to the mushrooms and toadstools of Britain & Ireland. London: HarperCollins, p. 592, fig. p. 595.
Kibby, G. (2017). Mushrooms and Toadstools of Great Britain & Europe, Volume 1, pp. 100-101.
O’Reilly, P. (2016). Fascinated by Fungi – exploring the majesty and mystery, facts and fantasy of the quirkiest kingdom on earth. Llandysul: First Nature, p. 298.
Sterry, P. and Hughes. B. (2009). Collins Complete Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools. London: HarperCollins, p. 290, fig. p. 291.

Sunday, 18 February 2018

Signs of spring …

Spring Hazelcup (Encoelia furfuracea)




Although widespread, E. furfuracea (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae) is generally regarded as an uncommon find in Britain. This irregularly shaped cup fungus can be found during the winter and spring. Typically clustered in small groups on the dead wood of Common Hazel Corylus avellana it has occasionally been recorded on Common Alder Alnus glutinosa.

References:

Sterry, P. and Hughes. B. (2009). Collins Complete Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools. London: HarperCollins, p. 308, fig. p. 309.

Wednesday, 14 February 2018

Little brown jobs …

Cortinarius pratensis




There are just fourteen records for Cortinarius pratensis currently listed on the FRDBI database [February, 2018]. The above specimens were located in a West Sussex sand dune system during a detailed search of the area in December 2017. My thanks to Nick Aplin of the Sussex Fungus Group for confirming their identification. It’s a fairly nondescript brown toadstool but certainly one to look out for if you enjoy little brown jobs …

References:

Edwards, A. and Leech, T. (2017). Evidence for an interesting association between Cortinarius pratensis (Section Dermocybe) and Sand Sedge, Carex arenaria. Field Mycology, 18(3), pp. 78-81.