Wednesday, 28 November 2012

Exam fever ...

Chiddingfold Forest, 9 and 10 June 2012

With exam fever continuing to take over our household, any opportunity to make a dash for fresh air and solitude is grabbed with both hands. A brief chance yesterday afternoon and likewise earlier today was greatly welcomed …

My reward yesterday, a beautiful female Orange Moth (Angerona prunaria). Though pleased, I was rather surprised to see this insect at 3.30 in the afternoon, as the male of this species typically flies at dusk, whilst the rather elusive female, generally much later into the night. It is a widely distributed species and generally only locally common in woodland and heathland across its range. Its larvae feed on a variety of trees and plants including birch, hawthorn, blackthorn and heather. Today as I entered the wood, I was greeted by a small company of the rather enchanting longhorn moth, Nemophora degeerella, gracefully dancing along the edge of the track. Numerous specimens of the highly distinctive Speckled Yellow (Pseudopanthera macularia) were also present, as indeed were numerous Speckled Wood and two Red Admiral making strategic claims for territory.

A male Stag Beetle (Lucanus cervus), the second I’ve found this year, provided a welcome find to end my visit.

Until next time ...




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